GALLANT:  
Rest in Peace, old buddy.
He was a retired rodeo horse, and he had been bred by Parker Ranch and
used on the ranch, before being sold to a family that used him on their own
ranch, and for rodeo. He was a fine horse. He was a son of Gallant Bear.

They brought him to us on a Sunday. He ate lunch in his stall  the next
Thursday, lay down, and died peacefully. No struggle, he just died of failure
from a chronic condition.

It cost us about $150.00 and a day's work and a lot of tears to dispose of him.

But what more can you ask, at the end,  than a full stomach, a soft clean place
to lie down, and someone to mourn your passing?

We have, however, begun to ask for a bit of a donation, if at all possible, for
surrendered animals!

<<--- Click on his picture to go to his page.
OUR WONDERFUL BOB!
It broke my heart to write this update.

This was a really, really cool horse. We were starting to ride
him. He knew a lot, was very handy, but was very short on
trust. We think it was a spinal lesion, from the sway back.

Bob was found wandering the subdivision wearing a ratty old
halter and trailing a short rope......
<-- Click on his picture

Larry is now Makana, and has been re-adopted, for the third
time, and lives in Tangerine Acres.
He was being very naughty where he was placed the first time, and we took
him back.
He was not back here at the rescue for four hours until
a nice lady from
Kona, who was second on the list, came and got him for her fiance', and
they re-named him Makana (it means Gift in Hawaiian) and they were
very happy with him.  He needed a one-on-one situation, because he
was always a little herd-bound had never really learned to bond with a
human. They did a good job winning his heart, but they found
themselves overwhelmed by other issues.

We were very happy to adopt him out, for the third time, to a lady who
has nine acres of good grass and a small black and white pony, and
Makana fell in love.
Click on his picture to see his second home.
<<---------
Too many horses fall through the cracks because people just
have the wrong horse. There is somebody for everybody.

The big tank is the water for the barn. The rain falls on the roof, runs
down the gutter into the tank, where we get it out with a gasoline
powered water pump.
Click here to read more about Larry
Counter
For Christmas a couple of years ago, we were able to purchase this
very rugged Hawaiian-style trailer, which helps us to go up into the
back country. T^his is a little 6 cylinder Ford F150 2WD truck,
which is easier on gas and is our feed-getter.
The CB Horse Rescue truck and new trailer
Hawaii Horse Rescue
We rescue, rehabilitate, and re-home equines; provide them with compassionate care and
rehabilitation; and finally find them a compatible, loving home. We believe that education is the
long term solution to improving the lives of equines.

CB Horse Rescue is a registered Hawaii nonprofit organization, 501(c)(3),  
dedicated to the compassionate care of equines. Your donations keep us going and the horses
happy.  We welcome you to join our growing list of sponsors, every little bit helps. As donations
increase we will be able to help more horses and donkeys.  Every little bit helps!
This is 'Colors'. She came in on Tuesday the 13th of April. I went and got her in the
new grey trailer, which is wonderful... She was standing in a pasture of wainaku
grass.  Wainaku grass is not for horses. They'll die rather than eat it. It is very bitter.
She had been given to the Rescue to live out her days in happy retirement. She
really is a lovely gal.
Colors is a babysitter if we ever saw one! She is a very kind, patient and loving mare.
She now has a loving family of little girls.
<----  Click on her picture if you want to see  the changes in her, in
only two months. This is amazing! You have to see this, it is almost
unbelievable.
Click here to read more about Bob
We will always take an adopted
animal back, and will honor them
and the people, with open arms
and love.
We have Long Ears! They are refugees and need homes badly.
The Waikoloa herd of Kona Nightingales has burgeoned beyond
manageability, and is being captured, vetted through the Aina Hou Animal
Hospital,  and adopted.
The response is wonderful, thank you, but we still need your help, because
the problem is not over yet. There are about 100 left in the wild.
With gasoline now up to $4.26,
excuse me, $4.66,  uh, no, $4.74 a
gallon, and our big rig really eats, we
could really use your help. It would
be wonderful if you could help us help
these sweet little guys.
Zebulon, top right, and at left waking up
from his castration at Aina Hou Animal
Hospital.. See the gal in the pen looking
out? Uncle Sonny on the horse. Dr.
Brady Bergin on the fence.
Fixing an overgrown hoof.
This is the Big Block Big Rig Ford F250 long bed with
the 460 engine, here seen pulling the Silverado 4 horse
slant load gooseneck aluminum trailer.

In 4WD low gear, this truck can climb almost
anywhere. To go into those really rugged back roads
and gnarly places, we hook up the gray trailer to this
truck.
NEW ADDITION not even a day old.
Born to one of the females we adopted
out. Look at his little fur hat!
Big happenings with the donkeys! GONE to Peaceful
Valley Donkey Rescue in Tehachapi, CA.  The males
have been castrated, and all have been checked for
health. Pleasant Valley Donkey Rescue is taking about
150, and Eagle Eye Rescue is taking about 30. They
flew out of Kona airport on September 16.
Here are some pictures of the processing day.  The
Humane Society of the United States is picking up the
tab, about $75,000.
Above: Veterinary teams doing their thing; Uncle Sonny
on horse.
Below: 'I see you, but mostly we
hear you.'
Keith Dane from HSUS and
helpers keeping the chute
moving.
Above: Inga Gibson
from HSUS and
Casey, who tames,
fosters,  and adopts
out young donkeys.
FOR ADOPTION and tame: The
beautiful Nana, with the
fashionable hair hat. Nana is very
interested in whatever you are
doing.
Below: MH SASSY SHOW GIRL, a registered
Miniature Horse mare, 17, the day she came in. She
looked a
whole lot better after just one week.
Rainrot, and half of that shaggy mane and tail came
off in the hairbrush.We had never had Minis before,
and she was just as nice as can be!
Happy to adopt her out to a Veterinary Technician.
Sassy could not have landed in a better situation!
This was a happy referral. This big
guy went to a big man. We love it
when all we have to do is make a
couple of phone calls. This guy eats
a bag of cubes a day, and we were
certainly happy when he went
directly from surrender to his new
home, on lots and lots of good
pasture. He has teeth and feet
issues that will all be solved.
This was the only trailer that fit. He
is 17.2 or thereabouts.
There is lots going on! We are replacing old fence, getting ready to string new
electric fence, and we have a Boarder! This is Beelzebub, on the left, a BLM donkey
from the Mainland. Her owners flew her in because they are very, very attached to
her.  She is longer backed and has longer, thinner ears than our genetically isolated
herd here. A real prospector's burro.
Baby time! These are of Nana's baby Sterling, and the brown donkey is Jethrene, who has been adopted. The big gelding is Victor,
who has an identical partner named Charlie. They are a matched pair, if anyone is into driving. Actually, in the nationwide driving
competition, five out of the top 35 4-ups, meaning, 4 beasts, were donkeys. I think V&C would make a terrific driving pair. They
look like full brothers, same size, colors, markings, and they match stride.
VICTOR
CHARLIE
JETHRENE adopted
What's the news? We have six donkeys up for adoption. Our boarder donkey's family has gone back to California for a while.
Our chief volunteer is leaving on the 28th.  That will leave us here by our lonesome and very sad. If you want to volunteer, or
give us a shout, or adopt somebody, go to the Contact Us page.
We still need homes for donkeys. There are ten troublemaking critters still roaming Waikoloa Village, and Uncle Stanley has
about 70 on his place. Dr. Brady Bergin, at Aina Hou Animal Hospital, has about 24 up at Waiki'i Ranch, and Waiki'i is
running out of grass. The ones up at Waki'i are geldings and pregnant females and jennets with foals.  We have six or seven
here to be adopted. Actually, if the Humane Society of the United States would charter another plane to take another 120 to
the Pleasant Valley Donkey Rescue in Tehachapi, CA, that would solve the entire problem. These donkeys MUST find
homes. Personally, since meeting and being around donkeys, I will always have donkeys. They are a hoot. I expect to keep
four, and the mother of the baby, below, is being sponsored. So that leaves... six here that need homes.
BIG NEWS! We are now a 501(c)(3) Corporation! Your donations will be TAX DEDUCTIBLE!